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Dr. Katerina Cerna

Postdoc and coordinator in the ACCESS project

Vita

Thesis: Designing for learning and knowing: Nurses in chronic care and patients’ self-monitoring data
Areas of study: Nursing, HCI, CSCW, Learning

In my work, I focus on how nurses’ work change when they get access to a new type of self-monitoring data of their patients, and what implications it will have for their work in terms of professional development. More specifically, I have conducted an ethnographic study within a pelvic cancer rehabilitation clinic, where I studied work of nurses in relation to development and use of a mobile application that supports collecting self-monitoring data of patients. By using a wide range of qualitative methods, I study the consequences of nurses participating in the design process of the mobile application and how their talks with their patients change when their get access to the new data.

Research interests:

● Participation: How to support stakeholders’ participation in various forms and phases of participatory design process?
● Learning: How can we support participants’ learning and empowerment when they become part of the participatory design process?
● Community: How can we support building communities around technologies through design?

2022


  • Older adults’ reasons to participate in digital skills learning: An interdisciplinary, multiple case study from Austria, Finland, and Germany

    Pihlainen Kaisa, Ehlers Anja, Rohner Rebekka, Cerna Katerina, Kärnä Eija, Hess Moritz, Hengl Lisa, Aavikko Lotta, Frewer-Graumann Susanne, Gallistl Vera, Müller Claudia
    Studies in the Education of Adults 2022. doi:10.1080/02660830.2022.2133268
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    The rapid development of digital technologies and their increasing application in many areas of everyday life challenge all citizens to continuously learn digital skills. This also applies to older adults, among whom digital literacy is on average less well-developed than among younger adults. This article investigates why retired older adults participate in opportunities to learn digital skills. Multiple case design with both qualitative and quantitative methods was used to include the views of older adults from Austria, Finland, and Germany. The results of this interdisciplinary study indicated individual, social and technical reasons for their participation in digital skills training. Practical implications and recommendations for future studies are suggested.
    @article{pihlainen_older_2022,
    title = {Older adults’ reasons to participate in digital skills learning: {An} interdisciplinary, multiple case study from {Austria}, {Finland}, and {Germany}},
    url = {https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02660830.2022.2133268?needAccess=true},
    doi = {https://doi.org/10.1080/02660830.2022.2133268},
    abstract = {The rapid development of digital technologies and their increasing application in many areas of everyday life challenge all citizens to continuously learn digital skills. This also applies to older adults, among whom digital literacy is on average less well-developed than among younger adults. This article investigates why retired older adults participate in opportunities to learn digital skills. Multiple case design with both qualitative and quantitative methods was used to include the views of older adults from Austria, Finland, and Germany. The results of this interdisciplinary study indicated individual, social and technical reasons for their participation in digital skills training. Practical implications and recommendations for future studies are suggested.},
    journal = {Studies in the Education of Adults},
    author = {Pihlainen, Kaisa and Ehlers, Anja and Rohner, Rebekka and Cerna, Katerina and Kärnä, Eija and Hess, Moritz and Hengl, Lisa and Aavikko, Lotta and Frewer-Graumann, Susanne and Gallistl, Vera and Müller, Claudia},
    month = oct,
    year = {2022},
    doi = {10.1080/02660830.2022.2133268},
    keywords = {italg},
    }

  • Situated Scaffolding for Sustainable Participatory Design: Learning Online with Older Adults

    Cerna Katerina, Müller Claudia, Randall Dave, Hunker Martin
    Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction 2022;6(Article No.: 12):1–25. doi:10.1145/3492831
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    An extensive literature on participatory design with older adults has, thus far, little to say about the support older adults need when involved in online activities. Our research suggests that to empower older adults in participatory design, scaffolding work has to be done. Scaffolding interactions – creating temporary instructional support to help the learning of participants – is a common approach in participatory design. Yet, when applied in online participatory design with older adults, the traditional understanding of the concept does not match the way older adults’ learn. Hence, we argue for a new understanding of this term, which we call situated scaffolding. We illustrate our argument with a case where older adults collaborate online as part of a participatory design project. We unpack the different dimensions of situated scaffolding and discuss how this novel understanding can be used to further inform sustainable participatory design for and with older adults.
    @article{cerna_situated_2022,
    title = {Situated {Scaffolding} for {Sustainable} {Participatory} {Design}: {Learning} {Online} with {Older} {Adults}},
    volume = {6},
    shorttitle = {Situated {Scaffolding} for {Sustainable} {Participatory} {Design}},
    url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3492831},
    doi = {10.1145/3492831},
    abstract = {An extensive literature on participatory design with older adults has, thus far, little to say about the support older adults need when involved in online activities. Our research suggests that to empower older adults in participatory design, scaffolding work has to be done. Scaffolding interactions - creating temporary instructional support to help the learning of participants - is a common approach in participatory design. Yet, when applied in online participatory design with older adults, the traditional understanding of the concept does not match the way older adults' learn. Hence, we argue for a new understanding of this term, which we call situated scaffolding. We illustrate our argument with a case where older adults collaborate online as part of a participatory design project. We unpack the different dimensions of situated scaffolding and discuss how this novel understanding can be used to further inform sustainable participatory design for and with older adults.},
    number = {Article No.: 12},
    urldate = {2022-01-18},
    journal = {Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Müller, Claudia and Randall, Dave and Hunker, Martin},
    month = jan,
    year = {2022},
    keywords = {scaffolding, learning, older adults, italg, participatory design online},
    pages = {1--25},
    }

  • Robots in heterogeneous contexts: Negotiation of co-creative lifelong learning spaces through participatory approaches

    Paluch Richard, Cerna Katerina, Volkova Galina, Seidler Michael, Weiler Tim, Obaid Mohammad, Müller Claudia
    2022. doi:10.48340/ecscw2022_ws01
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    Learning is inherently social. This raises several questions that relate to how contexts and spaces can mediate co-creative learning. In this workshop proposal, we refer to the interrelated aspects of space, learning, and embodiment and how these aspects mediate the human-robot interaction. Our assumption is that robots are interpreted variously and used in different ways. We are interested in the interrelation between interpretation and use, which are constitutive for the establishment of different co-creative learning spaces. Reflecting on this leads to an understanding of what to look for in Participatory Design studies. It matters, for example, whether persons in a nursing home have any say at all in how robots are perceived and in what technical practices robots are to be integrated and adopted. This is a crucial aspect for the appropriation of technical artifacts and for the development of new (E)CSCW or HCI paradigms.
    @article{paluch_robots_2022,
    title = {Robots in heterogeneous contexts: {Negotiation} of co-creative lifelong learning spaces through participatory approaches},
    issn = {2510-2591},
    shorttitle = {Robots in heterogeneous contexts},
    url = {https://dl.eusset.eu/handle/20.500.12015/4404},
    doi = {10.48340/ecscw2022_ws01},
    abstract = {Learning is inherently social. This raises several questions that relate to how contexts and spaces can mediate co-creative learning. In this workshop proposal, we refer to the interrelated aspects of space, learning, and embodiment and how these aspects mediate the human-robot interaction. Our assumption is that robots are interpreted variously and used in different ways. We are interested in the interrelation between interpretation and use, which are constitutive for the establishment of different co-creative learning spaces. Reflecting on this leads to an understanding of what to look for in Participatory Design studies. It matters, for example, whether persons in a nursing home have any say at all in how robots are perceived and in what technical practices robots are to be integrated and adopted. This is a crucial aspect for the appropriation of technical artifacts and for the development of new (E)CSCW or HCI paradigms.},
    language = {en},
    urldate = {2022-06-27},
    author = {Paluch, Richard and Cerna, Katerina and Volkova, Galina and Seidler, Michael and Weiler, Tim and Obaid, Mohammad and Müller, Claudia},
    year = {2022},
    note = {Accepted: 2022-06-22T04:34:50Z
    Publisher: European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    }

  • A Multilevel Model of Older Adults’ Appropriation of ICT and Acquisition of Digital Literacy

    Kärnä Eija, Aavikko Lotta, Rohner Rebekka, Gallistl Vera, Pihlainen Kaisa, Müller Claudia, Ehlers Anja, Bevilacqua Roberta, Strano Stefano, Maranesi Elvira, Cerna Katerina, Hengl Lisa, Kolland Franz, Waldenberger Franz, Naegele Gerd, Park Sieun, Hess Moritz, Reuter Verena, Frewer-Graumann Susanne, Korjonen-Kuusipuro Kristiina
    IJERPH 2022;19(23):1–14.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    Digital literacy refers to a set of competencies related to the skilled use of computers and information technology. Low digital skills can be a barrier for older adults’ full participation in a digital society, and COVID-19 has increased this risk of social exclusion. Older adults’ digital inclusion is a complex process that consists of the interplay of structural and individual factors. The ACCESS project unwrapped the complexity of the process and developed an innovative, multilevel model that illustrates how societal, institutional, material and pedagogical aspects shape adults’ appropriation of digital literacy. A holistic model describes factors contributing to older adults’ digital literacy, acknowledging sociocultural contexts, environments, learning settings and instruction practices for learning digital literacy. Instead of seeing older adults’ reasons for learning digital skills purely as individual choice, this model recognizes the interpersonal, institutional and societal aspects that implicitly or explicitly influence older adults’ acquisition of digital literacy. The results offer a tool for stakeholders, the research community, companies, designers and other relevant stakeholders to consider digital skills and the given support. It demands diverse communication between different stakeholders about the things that should be discussed when organizing digital support in digitalized societies.
    @article{karna_multilevel_2022,
    title = {A {Multilevel} {Model} of {Older} {Adults}’ {Appropriation} of {ICT} and {Acquisition} of {Digital} {Literacy}},
    volume = {19},
    url = {https://econpapers.repec.org/scripts/redir.pf?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.mdpi.com%2F1660-4601%2F19%2F23%2F15714%2Fpdf;h=repec:gam:jijerp:v:19:y:2022:i:23:p:15714-:d:984476},
    abstract = {Digital literacy refers to a set of competencies related to the skilled use of computers and information technology. Low digital skills can be a barrier for older adults’ full participation in a digital society, and COVID-19 has increased this risk of social exclusion. Older adults’ digital inclusion is a complex process that consists of the interplay of structural and individual factors. The ACCESS project unwrapped the complexity of the process and developed an innovative, multilevel model that illustrates how societal, institutional, material and pedagogical aspects shape adults’ appropriation of digital literacy. A holistic model describes factors contributing to older adults’ digital literacy, acknowledging sociocultural contexts, environments, learning settings and instruction practices for learning digital literacy. Instead of seeing older adults’ reasons for learning digital skills purely as individual choice, this model recognizes the interpersonal, institutional and societal aspects that implicitly or explicitly influence older adults’ acquisition of digital literacy. The results offer a tool for stakeholders, the research community, companies, designers and other relevant stakeholders to consider digital skills and the given support. It demands diverse communication between different stakeholders about the things that should be discussed when organizing digital support in digitalized societies.},
    number = {23},
    journal = {IJERPH},
    author = {Kärnä, Eija and Aavikko, Lotta and Rohner, Rebekka and Gallistl, Vera and Pihlainen, Kaisa and Müller, Claudia and Ehlers, Anja and Bevilacqua, Roberta and Strano, Stefano and Maranesi, Elvira and Cerna, Katerina and Hengl, Lisa and Kolland, Franz and Waldenberger, Franz and Naegele, Gerd and Park, Sieun and Hess, Moritz and Reuter, Verena and Frewer-Graumann, Susanne and Korjonen-Kuusipuro, Kristiina},
    year = {2022},
    keywords = {italg},
    pages = {1--14},
    }

2021


  • Fostering digital literacy through a mobile demo-kit development: Co-designing didactic prototypes with older adults

    Cerna Katerina, Müller Claudia
    Adjunct Publication of the 23rd International Conference on Mobile Human-Computer Interaction: 2021 New York, NY, USA. .
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    Developing toolkits as a support of participatory design is a common approach when designing with and for older adults. The key aspect in designing digital tools is digital literacy of the participants and how to sustain it during the project but also after its end. Yet, not enough attention has been paid to how to use such toolkits to make PD projects results sustainable. To address this issue, we are developing a mobile demo-kit, a set of didactic prototypes, which aims to foster older participants’ digital literacy and hence make findings sustainable. We illustrate it on a practice-based study, during which we conducted participatory observation, a series of interviews and organized a series of participatory workshops online with older adults. Our preliminary findings contribute to discussion on making PD with and for older adults sustainable by focusing on what older adults can learn during the PD, how to support this process but also how to communicate the findings further on.
    @inproceedings{cerna_fostering_2021,
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    title = {Fostering digital literacy through a mobile demo-kit development: {Co}-designing didactic prototypes with older adults},
    isbn = {978-1-4503-8329-5},
    shorttitle = {Fostering digital literacy through a mobile demo-kit development},
    url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3447527.3474849},
    abstract = {Developing toolkits as a support of participatory design is a common approach when designing with and for older adults. The key aspect in designing digital tools is digital literacy of the participants and how to sustain it during the project but also after its end. Yet, not enough attention has been paid to how to use such toolkits to make PD projects results sustainable. To address this issue, we are developing a mobile demo-kit, a set of didactic prototypes, which aims to foster older participants’ digital literacy and hence make findings sustainable. We illustrate it on a practice-based study, during which we conducted participatory observation, a series of interviews and organized a series of participatory workshops online with older adults. Our preliminary findings contribute to discussion on making PD with and for older adults sustainable by focusing on what older adults can learn during the PD, how to support this process but also how to communicate the findings further on.},
    urldate = {2022-01-13},
    booktitle = {Adjunct {Publication} of the 23rd {International} {Conference} on {Mobile} {Human}-{Computer} {Interaction}},
    publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Müller, Claudia},
    month = sep,
    year = {2021},
    keywords = {Older adults, Participatory design, Learning, italg, Didactic prototypes, Mobile demo-kit},
    pages = {1--6},
    }

  • Designing for New Forms of Vulnerability: Exploring transformation and empowerment in times of COVID-19

    Struzek David, Cerna Katerina, Paluch Richard, Bittenbinder Sven, Müller Claudia, Reuter A
    2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: 2021 . doi:10.1145/3411763.3441339
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @inproceedings{struzek_designing_2021,
    title = {Designing for {New} {Forms} of {Vulnerability}: {Exploring} transformation and empowerment in times of {COVID}-19},
    volume = {Extended Abstracts of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems},
    url = {https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.1145/3411763.3441339},
    doi = {10.1145/3411763.3441339},
    booktitle = {2021 {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
    author = {Struzek, David and Cerna, Katerina and Paluch, Richard and Bittenbinder, Sven and Müller, Claudia and Reuter, A},
    month = may,
    year = {2021},
    keywords = {italg},
    pages = {1--5},
    }

  • Making online participatory design work: Understanding the digital ecologies of older adults

    Cerna Katerina, Müller Claudia
    Proceedings of 19th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: 2021 . doi:10.18420/ecscw2021_n22
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    Participatory design (PD) is a meaningful approach to involve older adults into design; however, currently we lack understanding how to do such work online. In our paper, we report from a study where we organized 19 PD workshops online with older adults. We argue that to do so in a meaningful way, a mutually shaped understanding of older adults’ digital ecologies is at the core of organizing such PD processes. We present an empirical account of how digital ecologies of our older participants have become an issue to tackle in the online PD workshops. Further, we provide a solution, a mapping technique, and report from our efforts to evaluate it, that should help to overcome the situation when digital ecologies become a problem in PD online.
    @inproceedings{cerna_making_2021,
    title = {Making online participatory design work: {Understanding} the digital ecologies of older adults},
    shorttitle = {Making online participatory design work},
    url = {https://dl.eusset.eu/handle/20.500.12015/4161},
    doi = {10.18420/ecscw2021_n22},
    abstract = {Participatory design (PD) is a meaningful approach to involve older adults into design; however, currently we lack understanding how to do such work online. In our paper, we report from a study where we organized 19 PD workshops online with older adults. We argue that to do so in a meaningful way, a mutually shaped understanding of older adults’ digital ecologies is at the core of organizing such PD processes. We present an empirical account of how digital ecologies of our older participants have become an issue to tackle in the online PD workshops. Further, we provide a solution, a mapping technique, and report from our efforts to evaluate it, that should help to overcome the situation when digital ecologies become a problem in PD online.},
    language = {en},
    urldate = {2021-05-25},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of 19th {European} {Conference} on {Computer}-{Supported} {Cooperative} {Work}},
    publisher = {European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Müller, Claudia},
    year = {2021},
    note = {Accepted: 2021-05-18T10:05:04Z
    Publisher: European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    keywords = {italg},
    }

  • Transformation of HCI co-research with older adults: researchers’ positionality in the COVID-19 pandemic

    Cerna Katerina, Paluch Richard, Bäumer Fabian, Ertl Tanja, Müller Claudia
    Interaction design and Architectures: Designing during and for pandemics 2021;No. 50:21.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    In the time of COVID-19, many measurements to contain the pandemic contributed to social isolation and loneliness. Older adults in particular experience various forms of ageism in this regard, for example by being stereotyped as digitally illiterate. Hence, we need to learn more about the aging discourse in the context of participatory approaches, as it is currently lacking. This article presents the results from two participatory research projects that were significantly affected by the 1st COVID-19 lockdown. We specifically focus on the ways the relationships and modes of cooperation with our older research partners, i.e. the positionalities, have been impacted. We draw on the projects’ results, reflecting on the possible implications for the involvement of older adults in design and HCI research and specifically, technologies that are supportive and empowering for the individuals against the background of the pandemic situation.
    @article{cerna_transformation_2021,
    title = {Transformation of {HCI} co-research with older adults: researchers’ positionality in the {COVID}-19 pandemic},
    volume = {No. 50},
    url = {http://www.mifav.uniroma2.it/inevent/events/idea2010/doc/50_2.pdf},
    abstract = {In the time of COVID-19, many measurements to contain the pandemic contributed to social isolation and loneliness. Older adults in particular experience various forms of ageism in this regard, for example by being stereotyped as digitally illiterate. Hence, we need to learn more about the aging discourse in the context of participatory approaches, as it is currently lacking. This article presents the results from two participatory research projects that were significantly affected by the 1st COVID-19 lockdown. We specifically focus on the ways the relationships and modes of cooperation with our older research partners, i.e. the positionalities, have been impacted. We draw on the projects’ results, reflecting on the possible implications for the involvement of older adults in design and HCI research and specifically, technologies that are supportive and empowering for the individuals against the background of the pandemic situation.},
    language = {en},
    journal = {Interaction design and Architectures: Designing during and for pandemics},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Paluch, Richard and Bäumer, Fabian and Ertl, Tanja and Müller, Claudia},
    year = {2021},
    keywords = {italg},
    pages = {21},
    }

2020


  • Nurses’ work practices in design: managing the complexity of pain

    Cerna Katerina, Weilenmann Alexandra, Ivarsson Jonas, Rysedt Hans, Sigridur Islind Anna, Lundin Johan, Steineck Gunnar
    Journal of Workplace Learning 2020;32(2):135–146. doi:10.1108/JWL-05-2019-0062
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    Purpose The purpose of this study is to understand the activities in nurses’ work practices in relation to the design process of a self-monitoring application. Design/methodology/approach A design ethnographic approach was applied in this study. Findings To solve the problem of translating highly qualitative phenomena, such as pain, into the particular abstract features of a self-monitoring application, design participants had to balance these two aspects by managing complexity. In turn, the nurses’ work practices have changed because it now involves a new activity based on a different logic than the nurses’ traditional work practices. Originality/value This study describes a new activity included in nurses’ work practices when the nurses became part of a design process. This study introduces a novel way on how to gain a deeper understanding of existing professional practice through a detailed study of activities taking place in a design process. This study explores the possible implications for nurses’ professional practices when they participate in a self-monitoring application design process.
    @article{cerna_nurses_2020,
    title = {Nurses’ work practices in design: managing the complexity of pain},
    volume = {32},
    issn = {1366-5626},
    shorttitle = {Nurses’ work practices in design},
    url = {https://doi.org/10.1108/JWL-05-2019-0062},
    doi = {10.1108/JWL-05-2019-0062},
    abstract = {Purpose The purpose of this study is to understand the activities in nurses’ work practices in relation to the design process of a self-monitoring application. Design/methodology/approach A design ethnographic approach was applied in this study. Findings To solve the problem of translating highly qualitative phenomena, such as pain, into the particular abstract features of a self-monitoring application, design participants had to balance these two aspects by managing complexity. In turn, the nurses’ work practices have changed because it now involves a new activity based on a different logic than the nurses’ traditional work practices. Originality/value This study describes a new activity included in nurses’ work practices when the nurses became part of a design process. This study introduces a novel way on how to gain a deeper understanding of existing professional practice through a detailed study of activities taking place in a design process. This study explores the possible implications for nurses’ professional practices when they participate in a self-monitoring application design process.},
    number = {2},
    urldate = {2021-04-15},
    journal = {Journal of Workplace Learning},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Weilenmann, Alexandra and Ivarsson, Jonas and Rysedt, Hans and Sigridur Islind, Anna and Lundin, Johan and Steineck, Gunnar},
    month = jan,
    year = {2020},
    note = {Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited},
    keywords = {Learning, italg, Design ethnography, Information Technology, Managing complexity, Nurses, Pain, Professional practice, Self-monitoring application, Technological change, Workplace learning},
    pages = {135--146},
    }

  • Investigating the use of digital artifacts in a community project of sustainable food practices: ‘My chili blossoms’

    Engelbutzeder Philip, Cerna Katerina, Randall Dave, Lawo Dennis, Müller Claudia, Stevens Gunnar, Wulf Volker
    Proceedings of the 11th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society: 2020 New York, NY, USA. . doi:10.1145/3419249.3420089
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    Research on food practices has become more common among scholars of HCI in recent years. Human-Food-Interaction (HFI) looks into the interplay of humans, food and technology. HFI, even so, has paid relatively little attention to the more collective elements of food practice, including social bonding [1]. The modest project we describe below aimed to say something about the use of digital artifacts to support community engagement for sustainable food practices. We participated, as action researchers (see [2]) in a grassroots movement that instigated a project around learning about food growing, using digital means to bring interested people together during times of physical distancing: In the project Vegetables seek a home, people from various backgrounds ‘adopted’ a chili-plant, they are invited to share what they like in a Telegram-Group, and to get learning-modules via a mailing-list. Through an analysis of the communal effort to actualize the project (video-calls, Telegram, wechange.de) and the content of the Telegram-Group for the chili-plant adopting parents and experts, we suggest some design implications for grassroots communities and sustainable food practice. In future research we intend an iterative design to support the community and its project, utilizing Holmgren’s 12 principles of permaculture design.
    @inproceedings{engelbutzeder_investigating_2020,
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    series = {{NordiCHI} '20},
    title = {Investigating the use of digital artifacts in a community project of sustainable food practices: '{My} chili blossoms'},
    isbn = {978-1-4503-7579-5},
    shorttitle = {Investigating the use of digital artifacts in a community project of sustainable food practices},
    url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3419249.3420089},
    doi = {10.1145/3419249.3420089},
    abstract = {Research on food practices has become more common among scholars of HCI in recent years. Human-Food-Interaction (HFI) looks into the interplay of humans, food and technology. HFI, even so, has paid relatively little attention to the more collective elements of food practice, including social bonding [1]. The modest project we describe below aimed to say something about the use of digital artifacts to support community engagement for sustainable food practices. We participated, as action researchers (see [2]) in a grassroots movement that instigated a project around learning about food growing, using digital means to bring interested people together during times of physical distancing: In the project Vegetables seek a home, people from various backgrounds ‘adopted’ a chili-plant, they are invited to share what they like in a Telegram-Group, and to get learning-modules via a mailing-list. Through an analysis of the communal effort to actualize the project (video-calls, Telegram, wechange.de) and the content of the Telegram-Group for the chili-plant adopting parents and experts, we suggest some design implications for grassroots communities and sustainable food practice. In future research we intend an iterative design to support the community and its project, utilizing Holmgren's 12 principles of permaculture design.},
    urldate = {2021-04-15},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the 11th {Nordic} {Conference} on {Human}-{Computer} {Interaction}: {Shaping} {Experiences}, {Shaping} {Society}},
    publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
    author = {Engelbutzeder, Philip and Cerna, Katerina and Randall, Dave and Lawo, Dennis and M\üller, Claudia and Stevens, Gunnar and Wulf, Volker},
    month = oct,
    year = {2020},
    keywords = {Community, Learning, Sustainability, italg, Food, Grassroots, HFI, Sustainable HCI},
    pages = {1--4},
    }

  • Learning for life: Designing for sustainability of tech-learning networks of older adults

    Cerna Katerina, Dickel Martin, Müller Claudia, Kärnä Eija, Gallistl Vera, Kolland Franz, Reuter Verena, Naegele Gerhard, Bevilacqua Roberta, Kaspar Heidi, Otto Ulrich
    European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET) 2020;vol. 4, no. 2:12. doi:10.18420/ecscw2020_ws04
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    In today’s complex society we need to learn on a daily basis during our whole life, especially when it comes to new digital tools on which our lives are increasingly more dependent. However, the way digital tools are designed is not well adjusted to learning how to use these tools in the later part of life. As a result, many older adults struggle with the integration of digital tools into their daily lives. Recently, older adults started to be involved in design through sustainable participatory approaches. However, this group is very heterogeneous and characterised by varied needs that have to be addressed with a fitting approach that is currently missing in E/CSCW and participatory design. In this workshop we therefore want to bring together researchers from different disciplines to develop new approaches that will help us to design for sustainable tech-learning networks of older adults. ECSCW and related participatory design approaches have a long history of collaboration with different disciplines. Our workshop hence addresses the issues of how we can better understand supporting learning for life of tech-communities of older adults from an interdisciplinary perspective in the context of sustainable participatory design. The workshop participants will therefore have an opportunity to learn about the challenges and opportunities related to learning for life of tech-communities of older adults in the context of sustainable participatory design as well as to reflect over their own disciplinary position in relation to this topic.
    @article{cerna_learning_2020,
    series = {Reports of the {European} {Society} for {Socially} {Embedded} {Technologies}},
    title = {Learning for life: {Designing} for sustainability of tech-learning networks of older adults},
    volume = {vol. 4, no. 2},
    issn = {2510-2591},
    shorttitle = {Learning for life},
    url = {https://dl.eusset.eu/handle/20.500.12015/4062},
    doi = {10.18420/ecscw2020_ws04},
    abstract = {In today’s complex society we need to learn on a daily basis during our whole life, especially when it comes to new digital tools on which our lives are increasingly more dependent. However, the way digital tools are designed is not well adjusted to learning how to use these tools in the later part of life. As a result, many older adults struggle with the integration of digital tools into their daily lives. Recently, older adults started to be involved in design through sustainable participatory approaches. However, this group is very heterogeneous and characterised by varied needs that have to be addressed with a fitting approach that is currently missing in E/CSCW and participatory design.
    In this workshop we therefore want to bring together researchers from different disciplines to develop new approaches that will help us to design for sustainable tech-learning networks of older adults. ECSCW and related participatory design approaches have a long history of collaboration with different disciplines. Our workshop hence addresses the issues of how we can better understand supporting learning for life of tech-communities of older adults from an interdisciplinary perspective in the context of sustainable participatory design. The workshop participants will therefore have an opportunity to learn about the challenges and opportunities related to learning for life of tech-communities of older adults in the context of sustainable participatory design as well as to reflect over their own disciplinary position in relation to this topic.},
    language = {en},
    urldate = {2021-04-15},
    journal = {European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Dickel, Martin and Müller, Claudia and Kärnä, Eija and Gallistl, Vera and Kolland, Franz and Reuter, Verena and Naegele, Gerhard and Bevilacqua, Roberta and Kaspar, Heidi and Otto, Ulrich},
    year = {2020},
    note = {Accepted: 2020-06-15T07:28:12Z
    Publisher: European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    keywords = {italg},
    pages = {12},
    }

  • Learning for life: Designing for sustainability of tech-learning networks of older adults

    Cerna Katerina, Dickel Martin, Müller Claudia, Kärnä Eija, Gallistl Vera, Kolland Franz, Reu Verena
    Proceedings of 18th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: 2020 .
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]
    In this position paper, we take a concept – or parts of it – and run away with it (Mol 2002) to explore its potential to better understand the non/appropriation of technologies by people in later life. We introduce the concept of the city as a machine for learning developed by Colin McFarlane (2011) in the field of urban studies. We identify elements we consider inspiring for the study of socio-technical systems, translate them to smaller entities of human-technology interactions and test their usability to analyze how older people in later life integrate digital technologies in their everyday lives. We do so from two distinct vantage points, i.e. empirical contexts: A participatory design project of a neighborhood platform and related privacy issues from the perspective of older tenants, and the introduction of a new automated emergency call system in seniors’ apartments in a serviced senior living facility. We conclude with the suggestion to understand the concept “machine for learning” as a normative notion and a claim to accept the challenge it implies.
    @inproceedings{cerna_learning_2020-1,
    title = {Learning for life: {Designing} for sustainability of tech-learning networks of older adults},
    abstract = {In this position paper, we take a concept – or parts of it – and run away with it (Mol 2002) to explore its potential to better understand the non/appropriation of technologies by people in later life. We introduce the concept of the city as a machine for learning developed by Colin McFarlane (2011) in the field of urban studies. We identify elements we consider inspiring for the study of socio-technical systems, translate them to smaller entities of human-technology interactions and test their usability to analyze how older people in later life integrate digital technologies in their everyday lives. We do so from two distinct vantage points, i.e. empirical contexts: A participatory design project of a neighborhood platform and related privacy issues from the perspective of older tenants, and the introduction of a new automated emergency call system in seniors’ apartments in a serviced senior living facility. We conclude with the suggestion to understand the concept “machine for learning” as a normative notion and a claim to accept the challenge it implies.},
    language = {en},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of 18th {European} {Conference} on {Computer}-{Supported} {Cooperative} {Work}},
    publisher = {European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Dickel, Martin and Müller, Claudia and Kärnä, Eija and Gallistl, Vera and Kolland, Franz and Reu, Verena},
    year = {2020},
    keywords = {italg},
    pages = {6},
    }

  • From Design Space to Learning Place: Conceptualization for Meta Design Space for and with Older Adults

    Cerna Katerina, Müller Claudia
    International Reports on Socio-Informatics (ed. Volkmar Pipek & Markus Rohde) 2020;17(2):38–47.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{cerna_design_2020,
    title = {From {Design} {Space} to {Learning} {Place}: {Conceptualization} for {Meta} {Design} {Space} for and with {Older} {Adults}},
    volume = {17},
    url = {https://www.iisi.de/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/IRSIV17I2.pdf},
    number = {2},
    journal = {International Reports on Socio-Informatics (ed. Volkmar Pipek \& Markus Rohde)},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Müller, Claudia},
    year = {2020},
    keywords = {italg},
    pages = {38--47},
    }

  • Learning for Life: A Workshop Report

    Cerna Katerina, Müller Claudia
    International Reports on Socio-Informatics (ed. Volkmar Pipek & Markus Rohde) 2020;17(2):5–9.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{cerna_learning_2020-2,
    title = {Learning for {Life}: {A} {Workshop} {Report}},
    volume = {17},
    url = {https://www.iisi.de/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/IRSIV17I2.pdf},
    number = {2},
    journal = {International Reports on Socio-Informatics (ed. Volkmar Pipek \& Markus Rohde)},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Müller, Claudia},
    year = {2020},
    keywords = {italg},
    pages = {5--9},
    }

2019


  • Supporting self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder dysfunction in pelvic-cancer rehabilitation: An ethnographic study

    Cerna Katerina, Ivarsson Jonas, Weilenmann Alexandra, Steineck Gunnar
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 2019;28(13-14):2624–2634. doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14849
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    Aims and objectives To describe and understand strategies that oncological nurses use to support self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder issues in pelvic-cancer rehabilitation patients. Background Nurse-led self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder issues holds the potential to support cancer survivors. Design An ethnographic approach was applied in this study, which adhered to Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research (COREQ) guidelines. Methods Data collection was conducted in Sweden between October 2015–April 2018, involving observations of nurses’ daily work, formal and informal interviews, individual and group interviews, and reviews of relevant documents used in the studied practice. Furthermore, 15 supportive nurse–patient talks were observed, and an ethnographic analysis was performed. Results The analysis identified the following three categories of nursing strategies that support self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder issues in pelvic-cancer rehabilitation patients: encouraging self-reflection, tailoring solutions together and keeping patients motivated. Nurses and patients jointly make sense of patients’ symptoms using data that patients collect about themselves. Based on their shared understanding, they can co-create solutions to meet each individual patient’s needs and develop routines to keep the patient motivated in performing the devised solutions. Conclusions The results indicate that the strategies nurses use to support patients in self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder issues entail intertwining patients’ experiences with their nurses’ medical knowledge and specific clinical practice. Nurses’ strategies build on their ability to connect patients’ experiences and the elements of their own work practice. Relevance to clinical practice A deeper understanding of nurses’ strategies to support self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder issues in pelvic-cancer rehabilitation patients can improve other self-management programmes, inform nurses’ education and aid in the design of tools for pelvic-cancer rehabilitation support.
    @article{cerna_supporting_2019,
    title = {Supporting self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder dysfunction in pelvic-cancer rehabilitation: {An} ethnographic study},
    volume = {28},
    copyright = {© 2019 John Wiley \& Sons Ltd},
    issn = {1365-2702},
    shorttitle = {Supporting self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder dysfunction in pelvic-cancer rehabilitation},
    url = {https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jocn.14849},
    doi = {https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14849},
    abstract = {Aims and objectives To describe and understand strategies that oncological nurses use to support self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder issues in pelvic-cancer rehabilitation patients. Background Nurse-led self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder issues holds the potential to support cancer survivors. Design An ethnographic approach was applied in this study, which adhered to Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research (COREQ) guidelines. Methods Data collection was conducted in Sweden between October 2015–April 2018, involving observations of nurses’ daily work, formal and informal interviews, individual and group interviews, and reviews of relevant documents used in the studied practice. Furthermore, 15 supportive nurse–patient talks were observed, and an ethnographic analysis was performed. Results The analysis identified the following three categories of nursing strategies that support self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder issues in pelvic-cancer rehabilitation patients: encouraging self-reflection, tailoring solutions together and keeping patients motivated. Nurses and patients jointly make sense of patients’ symptoms using data that patients collect about themselves. Based on their shared understanding, they can co-create solutions to meet each individual patient's needs and develop routines to keep the patient motivated in performing the devised solutions. Conclusions The results indicate that the strategies nurses use to support patients in self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder issues entail intertwining patients’ experiences with their nurses’ medical knowledge and specific clinical practice. Nurses’ strategies build on their ability to connect patients’ experiences and the elements of their own work practice. Relevance to clinical practice A deeper understanding of nurses’ strategies to support self-management of radiation-induced bowel and bladder issues in pelvic-cancer rehabilitation patients can improve other self-management programmes, inform nurses’ education and aid in the design of tools for pelvic-cancer rehabilitation support.},
    language = {en},
    number = {13-14},
    urldate = {2021-04-16},
    journal = {Journal of Clinical Nursing},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Ivarsson, Jonas and Weilenmann, Alexandra and Steineck, Gunnar},
    year = {2019},
    note = {\_eprint: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/jocn.14849},
    keywords = {ethnography, italg, nurses, nurses’ strategies, nurses’ work, pelvic-cancer rehabilitation, radiation-induced dysfunction},
    pages = {2624--2634},
    }

  • Supporting Appropriation of Self- Monitoring Tools in Clinical Settings: The Case of Pain in Cancer Rehabilitation

    Cerna Katerina, Lundin Johan, Islind Anna Sigridur, Steineck Gunnar
    European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET) 2019. doi:10.18420/ecscw2019_p01
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    Self-monitoring tools, which support clinicians’ work through collection of patient generated data, have been used increasingly in chronic care. Their appropriation by the patients is crucial but at the same time can be problematic, as unexpected use of tools used as a support for clinical decisions might lead to wrong decisions. In this poster, we present preliminary findings from an ethnographic study from a pelvic cancer rehabilitation clinic. We present an empirical example of a patient who appropriated a self-monitoring application to register her pain in an unexpected way. Our findings aim to understand better how to support appropriation of self-monitoring tool in a clinical setting.
    @article{cerna_supporting_2019-1,
    series = {Reports of the {European} {Society} for {Socially} {Embedded} {Technologies}},
    title = {Supporting {Appropriation} of {Self}- {Monitoring} {Tools} in {Clinical} {Settings}: {The} {Case} of {Pain} in {Cancer} {Rehabilitation}},
    issn = {2510-2591},
    shorttitle = {Supporting {Appropriation} of {Self}- {Monitoring} {Tools} in {Clinical} {Settings}},
    url = {https://dl.eusset.eu/handle/20.500.12015/3286},
    doi = {10.18420/ecscw2019_p01},
    abstract = {Self-monitoring tools, which support clinicians’ work through collection of patient generated data, have been used increasingly in chronic care. Their appropriation by the patients is crucial but at the same time can be problematic, as unexpected use of tools used as a support for clinical decisions might lead to wrong decisions. In this poster, we present preliminary findings from an ethnographic study from a pelvic cancer rehabilitation clinic. We present an empirical example of a patient who appropriated a self-monitoring application to register her pain in an unexpected way. Our findings aim to understand better how to support appropriation of self-monitoring tool in a clinical setting.},
    language = {en},
    urldate = {2021-04-16},
    journal = {European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Lundin, Johan and Islind, Anna Sigridur and Steineck, Gunnar},
    year = {2019},
    note = {Accepted: 2019-05-22T04:07:29Z
    Publisher: European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    keywords = {italg},
    }

2018


  • Decision-support system for cancer rehabilitation: designing for incorporating of quantified data into an existing practice

    Cerna Katerina, Islind Anna Sigridur, Lundin Johan, Steineck Gunnar
    Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: 2018 New York, NY, USA. . doi:10.1145/3240167.3240255
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    Recent development in self-monitoring devices indicates that using quantified data in clinical practice supporting chronic diseases management holds a big potential. However, exploration of this design space also suggests that some unattended challenges still exist, such as a low adoption rate of self-monitoring tools in existing clinical practice. In this text, we therefore focus on the ways healthcare professionals use quantified data in their practice. We draw on empirical data from an ethnographic study of a cancer rehabilitation center. Our preliminary findings suggest that the self-monitoring tool supported the nurses’ work because it became a functional complement to their work by allowing them to appropriate the device to their and the patients’ needs.
    @inproceedings{cerna_decision-support_2018,
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    series = {{NordiCHI} '18},
    title = {Decision-support system for cancer rehabilitation: designing for incorporating of quantified data into an existing practice},
    isbn = {978-1-4503-6437-9},
    shorttitle = {Decision-support system for cancer rehabilitation},
    url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3240167.3240255},
    doi = {10.1145/3240167.3240255},
    abstract = {Recent development in self-monitoring devices indicates that using quantified data in clinical practice supporting chronic diseases management holds a big potential. However, exploration of this design space also suggests that some unattended challenges still exist, such as a low adoption rate of self-monitoring tools in existing clinical practice. In this text, we therefore focus on the ways healthcare professionals use quantified data in their practice. We draw on empirical data from an ethnographic study of a cancer rehabilitation center. Our preliminary findings suggest that the self-monitoring tool supported the nurses' work because it became a functional complement to their work by allowing them to appropriate the device to their and the patients' needs.},
    urldate = {2021-04-16},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the 10th {Nordic} {Conference} on {Human}-{Computer} {Interaction}},
    publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Islind, Anna Sigridur and Lundin, Johan and Steineck, Gunnar},
    month = sep,
    year = {2018},
    keywords = {italg, cancer rehabilitation, clinical practice, decision-support system, quantified data},
    pages = {747--753},
    }

M.A. Martin Dickel

Research assistant in the subproject “Cooperative creation of user autonomy in the context of an ageing society” in the Collaborative Research Centre “Media of Cooperation”.

Vita

After studying social sciences at the University of Siegen, Martin Dickel has been a member of the Collaborative Research Centre “Media of Cooperation” at the University of Siegen since 2018. As a research assistant in the CRC subproject “The Cooperative Creation of User Autonomy in the Context of the Ageing Society” he is interested in the question of how, on the basis of a community-based participative design approach, older adults can be involved in technology development and how sustainable appropriation infrastructures can be created.

2020


  • Learning for life: Designing for sustainability of tech-learning networks of older adults

    Cerna Katerina, Dickel Martin, Müller Claudia, Kärnä Eija, Gallistl Vera, Kolland Franz, Reuter Verena, Naegele Gerhard, Bevilacqua Roberta, Kaspar Heidi, Otto Ulrich
    European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET) 2020;vol. 4, no. 2:12. doi:10.18420/ecscw2020_ws04
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    In today’s complex society we need to learn on a daily basis during our whole life, especially when it comes to new digital tools on which our lives are increasingly more dependent. However, the way digital tools are designed is not well adjusted to learning how to use these tools in the later part of life. As a result, many older adults struggle with the integration of digital tools into their daily lives. Recently, older adults started to be involved in design through sustainable participatory approaches. However, this group is very heterogeneous and characterised by varied needs that have to be addressed with a fitting approach that is currently missing in E/CSCW and participatory design. In this workshop we therefore want to bring together researchers from different disciplines to develop new approaches that will help us to design for sustainable tech-learning networks of older adults. ECSCW and related participatory design approaches have a long history of collaboration with different disciplines. Our workshop hence addresses the issues of how we can better understand supporting learning for life of tech-communities of older adults from an interdisciplinary perspective in the context of sustainable participatory design. The workshop participants will therefore have an opportunity to learn about the challenges and opportunities related to learning for life of tech-communities of older adults in the context of sustainable participatory design as well as to reflect over their own disciplinary position in relation to this topic.
    @article{cerna_learning_2020,
    series = {Reports of the {European} {Society} for {Socially} {Embedded} {Technologies}},
    title = {Learning for life: {Designing} for sustainability of tech-learning networks of older adults},
    volume = {vol. 4, no. 2},
    issn = {2510-2591},
    shorttitle = {Learning for life},
    url = {https://dl.eusset.eu/handle/20.500.12015/4062},
    doi = {10.18420/ecscw2020_ws04},
    abstract = {In today’s complex society we need to learn on a daily basis during our whole life, especially when it comes to new digital tools on which our lives are increasingly more dependent. However, the way digital tools are designed is not well adjusted to learning how to use these tools in the later part of life. As a result, many older adults struggle with the integration of digital tools into their daily lives. Recently, older adults started to be involved in design through sustainable participatory approaches. However, this group is very heterogeneous and characterised by varied needs that have to be addressed with a fitting approach that is currently missing in E/CSCW and participatory design.
    In this workshop we therefore want to bring together researchers from different disciplines to develop new approaches that will help us to design for sustainable tech-learning networks of older adults. ECSCW and related participatory design approaches have a long history of collaboration with different disciplines. Our workshop hence addresses the issues of how we can better understand supporting learning for life of tech-communities of older adults from an interdisciplinary perspective in the context of sustainable participatory design. The workshop participants will therefore have an opportunity to learn about the challenges and opportunities related to learning for life of tech-communities of older adults in the context of sustainable participatory design as well as to reflect over their own disciplinary position in relation to this topic.},
    language = {en},
    urldate = {2021-04-15},
    journal = {European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Dickel, Martin and Müller, Claudia and Kärnä, Eija and Gallistl, Vera and Kolland, Franz and Reuter, Verena and Naegele, Gerhard and Bevilacqua, Roberta and Kaspar, Heidi and Otto, Ulrich},
    year = {2020},
    note = {Accepted: 2020-06-15T07:28:12Z
    Publisher: European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    keywords = {italg},
    pages = {12},
    }

  • Learning for life: Designing for sustainability of tech-learning networks of older adults

    Cerna Katerina, Dickel Martin, Müller Claudia, Kärnä Eija, Gallistl Vera, Kolland Franz, Reu Verena
    Proceedings of 18th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: 2020 .
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]
    In this position paper, we take a concept – or parts of it – and run away with it (Mol 2002) to explore its potential to better understand the non/appropriation of technologies by people in later life. We introduce the concept of the city as a machine for learning developed by Colin McFarlane (2011) in the field of urban studies. We identify elements we consider inspiring for the study of socio-technical systems, translate them to smaller entities of human-technology interactions and test their usability to analyze how older people in later life integrate digital technologies in their everyday lives. We do so from two distinct vantage points, i.e. empirical contexts: A participatory design project of a neighborhood platform and related privacy issues from the perspective of older tenants, and the introduction of a new automated emergency call system in seniors’ apartments in a serviced senior living facility. We conclude with the suggestion to understand the concept “machine for learning” as a normative notion and a claim to accept the challenge it implies.
    @inproceedings{cerna_learning_2020-1,
    title = {Learning for life: {Designing} for sustainability of tech-learning networks of older adults},
    abstract = {In this position paper, we take a concept – or parts of it – and run away with it (Mol 2002) to explore its potential to better understand the non/appropriation of technologies by people in later life. We introduce the concept of the city as a machine for learning developed by Colin McFarlane (2011) in the field of urban studies. We identify elements we consider inspiring for the study of socio-technical systems, translate them to smaller entities of human-technology interactions and test their usability to analyze how older people in later life integrate digital technologies in their everyday lives. We do so from two distinct vantage points, i.e. empirical contexts: A participatory design project of a neighborhood platform and related privacy issues from the perspective of older tenants, and the introduction of a new automated emergency call system in seniors’ apartments in a serviced senior living facility. We conclude with the suggestion to understand the concept “machine for learning” as a normative notion and a claim to accept the challenge it implies.},
    language = {en},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of 18th {European} {Conference} on {Computer}-{Supported} {Cooperative} {Work}},
    publisher = {European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    author = {Cerna, Katerina and Dickel, Martin and Müller, Claudia and Kärnä, Eija and Gallistl, Vera and Kolland, Franz and Reu, Verena},
    year = {2020},
    keywords = {italg},
    pages = {6},
    }

2019


  • How live streaming church services promotes social participation in rural areas

    Struzek David, Dickel Martin, Randall Dave, Müller Claudia
    Interactions 2019;27(1):64–69. doi:10.1145/3373263
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{struzek_how_2019,
    title = {How live streaming church services promotes social participation in rural areas},
    volume = {27},
    issn = {1072-5520},
    url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3373263},
    doi = {10.1145/3373263},
    number = {1},
    urldate = {2021-04-16},
    journal = {Interactions},
    author = {Struzek, David and Dickel, Martin and Randall, Dave and Müller, Claudia},
    month = dec,
    year = {2019},
    keywords = {italg},
    pages = {64--69},
    }

  • Co-Design von Community-Technologien im ländlichen Raum

    Struzek David, Dickel Martin, Müller Claudia
    DGG & DGGG Jahreskongress «Versorgung und Teilhabe»: 2019 Berlin, Germany. .
    [BibTeX]
    @inproceedings{struzek_co-design_2019,
    address = {Berlin, Germany},
    title = {Co-{Design} von {Community}-{Technologien} im ländlichen {Raum}},
    booktitle = {{DGG} \& {DGGG} {Jahreskongress} «{Versorgung} und {Teilhabe}»},
    publisher = {Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gerontologie und Geriatrie e.V. Berlin},
    author = {Struzek, David and Dickel, Martin and Müller, Claudia},
    year = {2019},
    keywords = {italg},
    }

  • Living Labs als Gestaltungs- und Aneignungsarena IKT-basierter Anwendungen im Gesundheits- und Pflegekontext. Implikationen partizipativer Entwicklung.

    Dickel Martin, Unbehaun David, Müller Claudia
    Berlin, Germany: 2019.
    [BibTeX]
    @book{dickel_living_2019,
    address = {Berlin, Germany},
    title = {Living {Labs} als {Gestaltungs}- und {Aneignungsarena} {IKT}-basierter {Anwendungen} im {Gesundheits}- und {Pflegekontext}. {Implikationen} partizipativer {Entwicklung}.},
    author = {Dickel, Martin and Unbehaun, David and Müller, Claudia},
    year = {2019},
    keywords = {italg},
    }

  • Designing for Sustainable Caring Communities – the CareComLabs Framework. In Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: The International Venue on Practice-centred Computing and the Design of Cooperation Technologi

    Müller Claudia, Kasper Heidi, Pelzelmayer Katharina, van Holten Karin, Struzek David, Dickel Martin
    2019. doi:10.18420/ecscw2019_p09
    [BibTeX]
    @book{muller_designing_2019,
    title = {Designing for {Sustainable} {Caring} {Communities} - the {CareComLabs} {Framework}. {In} {Proceedings} of the 17th {European} {Conference} on {Computer}-{Supported} {Cooperative} {Work}: {The} {International} {Venue} on {Practice}-centred {Computing} and the {Design} of {Cooperation} {Technologi}},
    author = {Müller, Claudia and Kasper, Heidi and Pelzelmayer, Katharina and van Holten, Karin and Struzek, David and Dickel, Martin},
    year = {2019},
    doi = {10.18420/ecscw2019_p09},
    keywords = {italg},
    }

  • Designing for Sustainable Caring Communities – the CareComLabs Framework

    Müller Claudia, Kasper Heidi, Pelzelmayer Katharina, van Holten Karin, Struzek David, Dickel Martin
    2019. doi:10.18420/ecscw2019_p09
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    The CareComLabs framework intends to provide a design and research space which in the long-term has the potential for setting up a collaborative learning space which serves both, a fruitful environment for developing appropriate socio-technical measures for ageing and caring at home, and to create structures which help the patients and community stakeholders in sustaining practices in the long-term, after the end of the project.
    @article{muller_designing_2019-1,
    title = {Designing for {Sustainable} {Caring} {Communities} – the {CareComLabs} {Framework}},
    issn = {2510-2591},
    url = {https://dl.eusset.eu/handle/20.500.12015/3280},
    doi = {10.18420/ecscw2019_p09},
    abstract = {The CareComLabs framework intends to provide a design and research space which in the long-term has the potential for setting up a collaborative learning space which serves both, a fruitful environment for developing appropriate socio-technical measures for ageing and caring at home, and to create structures which help the patients and community stakeholders in sustaining practices in the long-term, after the end of the project.},
    language = {en},
    urldate = {2021-04-16},
    author = {Müller, Claudia and Kasper, Heidi and Pelzelmayer, Katharina and van Holten, Karin and Struzek, David and Dickel, Martin},
    year = {2019},
    note = {Accepted: 2019-05-22T04:07:28Z
    Publisher: European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    keywords = {italg},
    }

2018


  • Ethnographie-basiertes und partizipatives IT-Design mit älteren Menschen. Herausforderungen und Möglichkeiten für die gemeinsame Gestaltungsarbeit im Feld

    Dickel Martin, Müller Claudia
    Alter(n)sgerechte Informatik: 2018 .
    [BibTeX]
    @inproceedings{dickel_ethnographie-basiertes_2018,
    title = {Ethnographie-basiertes und partizipatives {IT}-{Design} mit älteren {Menschen}. {Herausforderungen} und {Möglichkeiten} für die gemeinsame {Gestaltungsarbeit} im {Feld}},
    booktitle = {Alter(n)sgerechte {Informatik}},
    publisher = {FIfF-Kommunikation},
    author = {Dickel, Martin and Müller, Claudia},
    editor = {Zehendner, E.},
    year = {2018},
    keywords = {italg},
    }

woossmannMagᵃ.Art. Melanie Wooßmann

Research assistant for SFB-1187 „Medien der Kooperation“, Project A05

B.Sc.Timur Sereflioglu

Research assistant